Posts Tagged ‘manual transmissions’


A Vanishing Breed: Manual Transmissions and Transmission Repair in Mesa

Friday, July 13th, 2018

As your transmission repair shop in Mesa, we know that stick shifts are a vanishing breed where American cars are concerned, but they are still around…

Manual transmissions need transmission repair too | (480) 447-2727

Manual transmissions need transmission repair too | (480) 447-2727

Manual Transmission Repair is Still a Thing

In the US at least, manual transmissions are starting to fade away.  Part of the reason is simple economics.  It is far cheaper to tool a factory for only type of vehicle as opposed to two different transmission types.  Does that mean that there aren’t any manual transmission cars anymore?  Not at all.

For example, some consumers will often choose a stick shift to knock a bit off of the cost of a new car, or if the vehicle is sold in Asia or Europe, there are far more manual transmissions than automatic.  Some younger drivers in the US don’t even know how to drive a stick shift since they were raised on automatic transmissions.

Part of it is a mindset.  Americans like things to be convenient, and because most of our population lives near major population centers, most people just want to shift their vehicle and drive.  They don’t want to be gearing up or down.  However, to give you an idea of how popular and how influential manual transmissions are, some vehicles with automatic transmissions have features that imitate the performance of manual transmissions for the discerning driver.

Automatic Transmission or Not?

Toyotas and Nissans for example have a component in their transmission called a sport drive.  In a way, it’s kind of like a booster.  It’s similar to gearing your car up.  It’s a tieback to Nissan and Toyota’s early days when they were largely sports cars.  A lot of Japanese cars including Nissan and Toyota even have a gear shift that at first glance looks like an automatic transmission.  However, even though they are similar to a manual transmission, they are most definitely not manual transmission vehicles.  They have a complex and complicated automatic transmission installed as a result, they need automatic transmission repair.

How can you tell?  Well, first off, a manual transmission is all numbers except for R which stands for Reverse.  Otherwise, it’s 1-2-3-4.  Another way to tell?  Count the pedals.  An automatic transmission vehicle will only have two pedals: the brake and the gas.  A manual transmission will have three pedals: the clutch, the gas, and the brake.  Manual transmissions are starting to fade, and become classic cars.  So if you have a manual transmission, get it fixed the right way.  Go to a transmission repair shop in Mesa.

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Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
http://www.trailtransmission.com

Automatic Transmission Repair: Notes from Your Mesa Transmission Repair Shop (Conclusion)

Friday, December 1st, 2017

If you need automatic transmission repair in Mesa, then you want to take your cart to a professional shop.  By no means try to fix your transmission yourself.

Automatic Transmission Repair Should Be Left in the Hands of a Professional | (480) 447-2727

Automatic Transmission Repair Should Be Left in the Hands of a Professional | (480) 447-2727

Why Can’t I Fix My Transmission Myself?

In the old days, there were two types of transmissions: manual transmissions and automatic transmissions.  It was simple.  Automatic transmissions were complex machines and manual transmissions were simple.  Some people could easily work on a manual transmission as they had comparably fewer parts.  Even some earlier automatic transmissions were fairly easy to work on.  But nowadays, both automatic and manual transmissions have grown more complicated.

Even a manual transmission has computer modules installed that if you don’t know what you’re doing or you don’t have the proper tools or both can turn your car or truck into a very expensive sculpture sitting in your driveway.  If you live in an area with a homeowner’s association, they will not likely take kindly to a broken down vehicle sitting in your driveway for days or even weeks while you try and try again to fix it.  And what a lot of people don’t realize is that if you try to fix your transmission yourself, you could potentially void the warranty on your transmission, making transmission repair in Mesa even more expensive than before.

What Are Some Signs of Transmission Problems?

As we covered previously, when transmissions start to wear out, they can sometimes shimmy or shake, particularly when you accelerate or slow down.  Another sign that you have transmission problems?  Your check engine light comes on.  Another one is the dreaded pop or lurch.  When you accelerate, does your car lurch a bit?  That is usually one sign of a transmission problem.  Another one is a rough ride.

If your car feels like you’re going 4x4ing and you’re on a smooth stretch of road, there are many possible problems it could be.  One thing is you could have tires going bad.  Check your tread to make sure it’s not worn.  If that’s not the problem, you could be having transmission problems.   And if it is a transmission problem, it’s likely to get worse.

Transmission problems start out small and grow steadily.  Soon, you won’t be able to shift your car into reverse or drive if you have an automatic.  Or worse, you could have a gear shatter while you’re driving.  So, why take the chance?  Take  your vehicle in to a transmission specialist in Mesa.

 

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
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Transmission Repair in Mesa: Manual Vs. Automatic

Friday, October 28th, 2016

Transmission repair in Mesa hinges on an important question: manual or automatic? This article will attempt to dispel some myths about transmissions and how to fix them.

Call Trail Transmission for Transmission Repair In Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Call Trail Transmission for Transmission Repair In Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Manual Transmissions and Automatic Transmissions

What’s the difference between a manual transmission and an automatic transmission? With a manual transmission the driver is shifting gears up or down depending on speed and terrain. An automatic transmission is done by a computer module and the driver shifting rarely. With that said, here are some myths regarding automatic and manual transmissions.

Myth #1: Manual Transmissions Are Simpler than Automatics

In older sports cars, manual transmissions are a lot simpler than automatics. However, a lot of next generation manual transmissions are a lot more complicated than they used to be, with computer chips and a few extra gears. They are in a way, almost a hybrid between manual transmissions and automatic transmissions. Both require transmission service.

The repair jobs are different, and like all repair jobs, some are easier than others are. By no means, however, should you attempt to do transmission repair on your own unless you know for sure what you’re doing. And no, reading a book, or watching a video is adequate preparation.

Most transmission repair shops in Mesa have ASE certified mechanics with years of both study and experience.

Myth #2: Automatic Transmissions Need More Work Than Manual Transmissions

Again, this is old information. During the 70’s and 80’s a lot of cars made in the US had rather shoddy transmissions. They would break down at one of the milestone markers, and repairs were costly. That’s how this myth got so firmly planted in our consciousness.

Myth #3: A Manual Transmission Will Outlive an Automatic Transmission.

Yes and no on this. While manual transmissions do indeed last longer than automatic transmissions do, clutches get replaced far more often than components in an automatic transmission. So it kind of evens out.

Transmission Repair: Some Words to Live By

Your owner’s manual should always be your guide.  If your owner’s manual says to get your transmission serviced every 15,000 miles, then get it serviced every 15,000 miles.  While you may grumble about having to pay for a bit of service, which would you rather have?  A repair bill that is a few hundred dollars, or a major transmission replacement to the tune of many thousands of dollars in some cases.

So whether you need clutch repair or transmission repair, remember that you are responsible for your car.

So take it to someone that can help, your friendly transmission repair shop in Mesa.

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Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
Visit Our Site

Manual Transmission Repair Needs a Professional Mechanic (Conclusion)

Friday, August 7th, 2015

Before you try to do manual transmission repair on your own, there are a few things you must consider before you get your car up on jacks and start tearing apart your assembly.

Find the right transmission repair shop in Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Find the right transmission repair shop in Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Manual Transmissions Are Complex

Manual transmissions are one of the most complex parts of the workings of any vehicle and this is good enough reason not to try and tackle repairs to the transmission but to take the vehicle to a qualified mechanic. In old school vehicles, clutches and manual transmissions were a lot more rudimentary.  However, a lot of modern manual transmissions are more complex.

While there are two types of the manual transmission, the constant mesh and sliding gear, the mesh is the most common, with the sliding gear being all but obsolete. The modern transmissions used in vehicles today are the constant mesh ones and the difference is that the main shaft gears are with the cluster gears in the constant mesh, while in the sliding gear they are not. The manual transmission vehicle is generally considered to be the more fun to drive, however there are some individuals who do prefer the automatic transmission.

Clutch Service Is Better Than Clutch Repair

As you can see there are many things that can go wrong with a manual transmission which means you need to seek the help of a qualified mechanic to undertake manual transmission repairs due to the complexity of the transmission. Prevention is of course better than cure and there are some things the car owner can do in regards to maintaining their manual transmission and so help themselves to avoid issues. Otherwise, they might find themselves having to deal with clutch repair and/or manual transmission repair.  While it is tempting to let it go, sometimes you have to be proactive.

To help avoid potential issues with the transmission or the clutch drivers should ensure when using the clutch they always press is down fully and never be tempted to “ride it” as by doing so you may help to wear it out. Don’t use the clutch to help to you slow down by tapping it and when going down gears accelerate or the vehicle may lurch and this can stress out the clutch along with the transmission. These tips may help you to avoid manual transmission repairs with a qualified mechanic.

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
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Clutch Repair

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Clutch repair is part and parcel to owning a manual transmission.  Here is some information about manual transmissions

Manual Transmissions: What They Are

Call Trail Transmission for Transmission Repair In Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Call Trail Transmission for Transmission Repair In Mesa | (480) 447-2727

First off what is a manual transmission?  Well according to WIKIPEDIA:
“A manual transmission, also known as a manual gearbox, stick shift (for vehicles with hand-lever shifters), standard transmission, or simply a manual, is type of transmission used in motor vehicle applications. It uses a driver-operated clutch engaged and disengaged by a foot pedal (automobile) or hand lever (motorcycle), for regulating torque transfer from the engine to the transmission; and a gear stick operated by foot (motorcycle) or by hand (automobile).
A conventional, 5 or 6-speed manual transmission is often the standard equipment in a base-model car; other options include automated transmissions such as an automatic transmission (often a manumatic), a semi-automatic transmission, or a continuously variable transmission (CVT).” SOURCE ARTICLE

The article goes on to talk about the different types of manual transmissions, and believe us there are a lot of them.  A lot of classic cars for example have manual transmissions.

Clutches and Clutch Repair

Not all classic cars are ridiculously expensive.  Some older mini coopers for example are quite affordable.  In addition, millennials are bringing clutches back.  A lot of younger people straddle the past and the present.  So remember, if you have a manual transmission it isn’t as old-timey as you might think.  Think of it as retro.  So you could end up not being someone that’s making do with an older technology, you could be as individual as your car can be as well.

Change your oil every 5,000 miles, 3,000 if it is an older vehicle.  Replace your wiper blades periodically, and rotate your tires.  And make sure you get your car into a shop that does clutch service to keep your car running its best.

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
Clutch Repair

 

Manual Transmissions in the 21st Century

Friday, March 7th, 2014

Manual transmissions often get a bad rap in our opinion.  They are still a part of  life on the road in Arizona.

Stick Shifts: Falling By The Wayside?

Sometimes, it’s sad to lose things from our past.  Here is what happened where manual transmissions are concerned. From CNN.COM:

“After General Motors released the first automatic transmission — the 1940 Oldsmobile Hydra-Matic — automobile manufacturers swiftly moved away from manuals. By 1957, 82.7% of American-made cars were equipped with automatic transmissions, according to “Ward’s 1958 Autom

Have a Manual Transmission? Give US a Call| (480) 447-2727

Have a Manual Transmission? Give US a Call| (480) 447-2727

otive Yearbook.” Though manuals have accounted for about 4% of American car sales in recent years, experts were surprised to see the percentage jump almost 3% in the first quarter of 2012, according to a report by Edmunds.com. The percentages may seem small, but with nearly 12.8 million cars sold in the U.S. last year, those sales add up to more than a half million manuals. Some manufacturers have inferred that the 6.98% “take rate,” or percentage of total cars bought, signifies a manual comeback in the consumer market.” SOURCE ARTICLE

Did you hear that last part?  Manual transmissions may be making a comeback.  Why?  Because of millennials, the generation that reached adulthood as the century changed.  They like retro things from the past, but also love the technology of the present.  A perfect fit where manual transmissions are concerned.  Another reason that millennials love manual transmissions is that they are low maintenance compared to automatics.

Learning to Drive a Stick Shift

A lot of us who reached adulthood learned how to drive a stick shift.  It was a rite of passage for us.  Even now, we can probably chant the mantra of Clutch Shift Release.  To those of you out there who don’t know how to drive sticks, you push down on the clutch pedal, you shift gears, and then you release the clutch.

So remember, that while automatics are largely the norm on the roads these days, you want to make sure that you don’t discount manuals.  Manual transmissions may be coming back.

 

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
Contact Us

Clutch Repair

Friday, February 28th, 2014

Manual transmissions sooner or later will need to have clutch repair done.  First off how many of them are there out there?

Manual Transmissions

Get Clutch Repair in Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Get Clutch Repair in Mesa | (480) 447-2727

In the US, there aren’t too many manual transmissions any more. Estimates vary, but there are about two million of them still around.  Most people in the US prefer an automatic transmission to a manual one. In Europe on the other hand, there are a lot more manual transmissions than automatic ones.

One car group that almost always have manual transmissions are classic cars. A lot of people even now prefer manual transmissions to automatic ones because of the freedom that they give. And if you live in a rural area, it is fun to shift gears up and down like you’re some sort of race car driver. But in the city, however, automatic transmissions are a thousand times better. And it is a rite of passage to train a young driver on a stick shift, rather than just having them put it into gear and going. A lot of people will get into arguments regarding having a clutch versus having an automatic.

How Often is it Necessary to Repair a Clutch?

Want our take? Both cars have strengths and weaknesses. So get the car that makes you happy. If you want to shift and then forget, get an automatic transmission. If you want to shift gears a lot, get a manual. Clutches aren’t obviously as sophisticated as automatics are, however, they still can break. The timeframes are usually in the 60,000 range, however, as opposed to the 30,000 range as a rule. Even though they are simple, you never want to try to fix a clutch yourself unless you have a mechanic’s background.

So remember, life is about choices. Regular coffee or decaf? Smoking or non-smoking? And of course automatic or manual transmission?

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
http://www.trailtransmission.com/

Car Components Part II: Manual Transmissions and Clutches

Monday, January 21st, 2013
Clutch repair in Mesa

Clutch repair in Mesa | (480) 447-2727

Part two of our three part series will explore manual transmissions and clutches.  In part one, we covered the automatic transmission.  In part three, we’ll explore what a rear differential is.

What is a Manual Transmission?

According to this WIKIPEDIA article:

Manual transmissions often feature a driver-operated clutch and a movable gear stick. Most automobile manual transmissions allow the driver to select any forward gear ratio (“gear”) at any time, but some, such as those commonly mounted on motorcycles and some types of racing cars, only allow the driver to select the next-higher or next-lower gear. This type of transmission is sometimes called a sequential manual transmission. Sequential transmissions are commonly used in auto racing for their ability to make quick shifts.[citation needed]

Manual transmissions are characterized by gear ratios that are selectable by locking selected gear pairs to the output shaft inside the transmission. Conversely, most automatic transmissions feature epicyclic (planetary) gearing controlled by brake bands and/or clutch packs to select gear ratio. Automatic transmissions that allow the driver to manually select the current gear are called Manumatics. A manual-style transmission operated by computer is often called an automated transmission rather than an automatic.

To read more of this article, please click here.  Otherwise, keep reading below.

Are Clutches Better Than Automatics?

It really depends on who you ask.  A lot of car enthusiasts prefer a manual transmission to an automatic as it allows for greater control of the vehicle by the driver.  And on the open road, a clutch is a wonderful thing.  However, the problem that clutches have is that in stop and go traffic common to a major metropolitan area like Mesa, you’re always either gearing up or gearing down.

Clutches are usually less prone to transmission problems, but like all mechanical components they can break or malfunction too.   After awhile, constant gearing up and down can cause the gears to wear down, making a trip to an auto mechanic who does clutch repair a requirement.

Trail Transmission does both clutch repair and automatic transmission repair in and around the Mesa area.

Trail Transmission
11240 East Apache Trail
Apache Junction, AZ 85120-3529
(480) 447-2727
http://www.trailtransmission.com/

Car Components Part I: Automatic Transmission
Car Components Part II: Manual Transmissions and Clutches
Car Components Part III: Rear Differentials